Students’ opinions of Manufacturing Pasts materials – Part I

At the beginning of the summer just gone, I was able to run three focus groups with 2nd and 3rd year University of Leicester undergraduate history students, to get their opinions of the Manufacturing Pasts industrial history materials we’re discovering and preparing and putting online. At the time, we had not even created too many materials yet, and the website was in an embryonic state, but we wanted to get some early evaluation to inform future work. And it goes without saying that getting students’ opinions is vital; they are the intended ‘customer’ of our project materials.

I gave the students about 45 minutes to look at and listen to some of the videos, Powerpoint presentations, and ebooks I had created, having to do with the Liberty Building and the Corah factory. All of the students spent the full amount of time and were very engaged with what they were watching and reading and listening to.

When I asked: how might these materials be used in a history module such as the ones you are taking now?, I was fascinated by the connections they were seeing with whatever history topic they were currently working on. They brought up:

  • Post World War II study and the loss of community when manufacturing failed
  • Gender studies, noticing the different work being done by women and by men in the Corah photos
  • Immigration
  • Philanthropy by company owners in the 19th century
  • fashion history
  • comparison of manufacturing processes then and now

They suggested a number of ways the materials might be brought into their modules:

  • The lecturer uses the photos and interviews in lectures
  • The videos and photos could be used in seminars for discussion
  • Gobbet papers could be assigned based on any of these materials
  • Essay questions can target the primary sources in MyLeicestershire History
  • Buildings and areas covered by these materials can be visited, with the materials carried along in smartphones or tablets for reference, to see what they look like now

One student commented that these materials could be used to comprise museum exhibitions, because the copyright issue has already been addressed. This was the first time in my discussions with students that I saw  the penny drop as to why an open license is important.

I shall discuss more about these student evaluations in future blog posts.  Overall, students liked these materials and their historical interests seemed to be quite sparked by both the online collections of primary sources and the mashups we put together as part of the project.

Terese Bird, Learning Technologist, University of Leicester

 

 

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